essay on aids victims and stigmatization pdf

Essay on aids victims and stigmatization pdf

File Name: essay on aids victims and stigmatization .zip
Size: 2601Kb
Published: 08.04.2021

Actions for this page

Background

Cookies in use

Stigma, HIV and health: a qualitative synthesis

Actions for this page

Not a MyNAP member yet? Register for a free account to start saving and receiving special member only perks. An epidemic is both a medical and a social occurrence. Medically, it is the appearance of a serious, often fatal, disease in numbers far greater than normal. Socially, it is an event that disrupts the life of a community and causes uncertainty, fear, blame, and flight.

PLoS Med 3 10 : e This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. The modern concept of a social stigma comes from the work of American sociologist Erving Goffman, who described it as a response to a deeply discrediting attribute that devalues the person [ 1 ]. In the medical literature, stigma is almost inevitably written about in terms of adverse social sequelae of a disease—such as leprosy, tuberculosis, epilepsy, schizophrenia, or filariasis [ 2—6 ]—or a physical characteristic or functional loss, such as obesity, deafness, or paraplegia [ 7—9 ].

Background

Gaining a contextualized understanding of how this stigma is experienced by YLWHA in Western Uganda is crucial in addressing it in this group and setting. Photovoice was used to gain insight into the lived experiences of HIV-related stigma in 11 YLWHA 15—19 years , purposively selected from a hospital-based peer support group. Group interview transcripts, notes and photographs were subjected to phenomenological hermeneutic analysis. Encounters with enacted, anticipated and internalized stigmas and their myriad sequels were prevalent in the photos and narratives of participants. Our findings were categorized and presented in 5 main themes that were identified through the analysis: being devalued, experiencing fear, experiencing injustices, feeling lonely, and lacking future perspectives. HIV-related stigmas were experienced in various socio-ecological domains but predominantly in homes and schools that ought to be supportive surroundings for youths.


Although HIV-related stigma is often seen as the greatest barrier to In writing this Essay, our aim is neither to diminish the suffering of of stigma on discrimination against leprosy sufferers—minimizing the harm. Available: http://​rnasystemsbiology.org


Cookies in use

HIV continues to be a major public health crisis both in the United States and around the world. While major scientific advances have made it easier than ever to prevent and treat HIV, there remains no vaccine or cure, and tens of thousands of people continue to contract HIV every year. Insufficient funding for public health programs, ideological opposition to common sense prevention policies, and societal barriers like stigma and discrimination, have made it especially difficult for us to turn the tide against the epidemic. According to the U. If current diagnosis rates continue , 1 in 6 gay and bisexual men will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime.

Metrics details. HIV-related stigma continues to negatively impact the health and well-being of people living with HIV, with deleterious effects on their care, treatment and quality of life. A growing body of qualitative research has documented the relationship between HIV-related stigma and health. This review aims to synthesize qualitative evidence that explored the intersections of stigma and health for people with HIV. A thematic summary was conducted that was guided by the qualitative metasummary technique developed by Sandelowski and Barraso.

Stigma, HIV and health: a qualitative synthesis

Metrics details. Stigmatization creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear of victimization. A descriptive cross sectional study was designed to collect data using an anonymous self-administered structured questionnaire from HCWs. The study was conducted in clinical departments of a large multidisciplinary bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Durban, KZN. The study also revealed that patients were sometimes tested for HIV without informed consent before surgery, due to fear of being infected, and there was some gossiping about patients' HIV status by HCWs, thereby compromising patient confidentiality.

Stigma is when someone sees you in a negative way because of a particular characteristic or attribute such as skin colour, cultural background, a disability or a mental illness. When someone treats you in a negative way because of your mental illness, this is discrimination. Stigma happens when a person defines someone by their illness rather than who they are as an individual. For people with mental health issues, the social stigma and discrimination they experience can make their problems worse, making it harder to recover. It may cause the person to avoid getting the help they need because of the fear of being stigmatised. Get the mental health treatment you need.

COVID is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

Standing Up to Stigma

​​​​​​​HIV/AIDS and Human Rights

Stigmatization creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear of victimization. A descriptive cross sectional study was designed to collect data using an anonymous self-administered structured questionnaire from HCWs. The study was conducted in clinical departments of a large multidisciplinary bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Durban, KZN. The study also revealed that patients were sometimes tested for HIV without informed consent before surgery, due to fear of being infected, and there was some gossiping about patients' HIV status by HCWs, thereby compromising patient confidentiality. The majority of HCWs showed a willingness to report incidents of stigmatization and discrimination to higher authorities, for better monitoring and control. More psychological support and counselling should be provided to HCWs, to further reduce the impact of stigmatization and discrimination against PLWHA. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome AIDS was first identified in the 's and since then has spread globally causing one of the most dreaded pandemics of modern times [ 1 ].

Stigma, HIV and health: a qualitative synthesis

More than thirty years after the first clinical evidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was reported, AIDS has become one of the most devastating diseases humankind has ever faced. Since the epidemic began, more than 60 million people have been infected with the virus and nearly 30 million people have died of HIV-related causes. AIDS has become the sixth-largest cause of death worldwide.

3 comments

  • Lalo C. 12.04.2021 at 14:44

    17 This contributes to the expansion of the global HIV epidemic and a higher number of AIDS-related deaths. An unwillingness to take an HIV test means that more.

    Reply
  • Ken M. 13.04.2021 at 05:39

    Approach: Improving clinical care for patients living with HIV through participatory activities From the start of the AIDS epidemic, stigma and discrimination have fuelled the trans- mission of HIV and org/pdfs/horizons/rnasystemsbiology.org

    Reply
  • Joey F. 16.04.2021 at 04:05

    The complexity of HIV/AIDS related stigma is often cited as a primary reason for the Goffman E. Asylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and at: rnasystemsbiology.org

    Reply

Leave a reply