confucianism and democratization in east asia pdf

Confucianism and democratization in east asia pdf

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Industrialization and Democratization in East Asia

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Introduction

Confucianism and democratization in East Asia

What types of political systems do people in East Asia favor most and least? Throughout the region, do most people uniformly prefer democracy to nondemocratic systems, as advocates of universal democratization theses claim? If they do, do they prefer liberal democracy to non-liberal democracy? If they do not favor democracy more than other types of political systems, what type do they favor most? Is it meritocracy or a hybrid system, for which proponents of Confucian democracy or the Asian Values Thesis have recently advocated?

Industrialization and Democratization in East Asia

It seems that you're in Germany. We have a dedicated site for Germany. All, except Singapore, employed Confucianism as the state ideology before the West came to East Asia. The differences and similarities between the variety of Confucian schools are examined. The author concludes that the philosophical and ethical principles of Confucianism will assist in the industrialization and democratization of the region. His main research fields are East Asian economic development, Chinese philosophy, non-linear theory, non-linear economic dynamics, trade theory, urban and regional economics, and ethics.

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This book is the latest contribution to the decades-long debate over whether and if so, how democracy should take root in East Asia. On one side, a spectrum of political and public figures, including Lee Kwan Yew, Fareed Zakaria, and Tu Wei-ming, have insisted that democracy is culturally specific: it reflects fundamentally Western individualism and is neither appropriate for nor attractive to Confucian societies broadly speaking, the swath of Chinese-influenced cultures stretching from Japan to Singapore , which are culturally more receptive to moral authoritarianism. Like any question of public Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in. To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above.

The system can't perform the operation now. Try again later. Citations per year. Duplicate citations. The following articles are merged in Scholar. Their combined citations are counted only for the first article.

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Dec 27, The book, Confucianism and Democratization is a scholarly work written by the author, D. The previous work on this book done by me presents the details of the book how the author has dealt with an old and intricate topic whether Confucianism is associated with democratization, and if yes, in what ways these two are interlinked.

Introduction

This book is the latest contribution to the decades-long debate over whether and if so, how democracy should take root in East Asia. On one side, a spectrum of political and public figures, including Lee Kwan Yew, Fareed Zakaria, and Tu Wei-ming, have insisted that democracy is culturally specific: it reflects fundamentally Western individualism and is neither appropriate for nor attractive to Confucian societies broadly speaking, the swath of Chinese-influenced cultures stretching from Japan to Singapore , which are culturally more receptive to moral authoritarianism. Like any question of public Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in.

To examine whether Confucianism is compatible or obstructive to democracy, one needs to undertake several important tasks. First, the meaning of Confucianism must be clearly defined. And third, how strong these ideas, beliefs, and preferences are, and whether they are contributing to or obstructing democracy must be demonstrated with empirical data. Most of the literature on the relationship between Confucianism and democracy has, at best, achieved the first and second goals, but is seldom capable of testing these arguments with empirical data. This book elegantly advances this research puzzle into a new frontier.

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The relationship between Confucianism and democracy has been widely debated among contemporary Confucian political theorists.

Confucianism and democratization in East Asia

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The theoretical reviews are sound and there are very good theoretical discussions of the relations between economic development, value change, and democratization. Worldwide newspaper headlines in recent years have covered political unrest in many East Asian nations. Democracy is not the dominant form of government in many of these nations.

Political Confucianism and Multivariate Democracy in East Asia

Edited by Andre Bächtiger, John S. Dryzek, Jane Mansbridge, and Mark Warren

Japanese public deliberation promises to deepen democracy within a liberal democratic system, while Chinese deliberative processes may have the potential to introduce democratic moments into an authoritarian system. In this chapter we aim to develop an understanding of how two key East Asian contexts, Japan and China, are developing deliberative institutions. We examine their cultural, institutional, and historical features, discuss the driving forces, characteristics, and patterns of deliberative institutions, and investigate the impact of Confucian culture. To apply the systematic approach we also examine the potential for deliberative capacity building, as well as assess the prospects for deliberative democracy in East Asia. Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription. Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

Doh Chull Shin: Confucianism and Democratization in East Asia

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